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General Information

What is Stress?

Everyone experiences stress and anxiety at one time or another. The difference between them is that stress is a response to a threat in a situation. Anxiety is a reaction to the stress.

ADAA Resource
What is Anxiety?

Anxiety occurs when thought patterns are disturbed to include obsessive thinking, excessive worrying, experiencing fear of a specific thing or event, and stress that is out of proportion to the impact of the event.

Michigan Medicine Depression Center NIMH Resource
How to Stop Paranoia and Anxiety

For some, uncertainties from our daily lives develop into paranoia, and overwhelming fear that people want to hurt you. With the right tools, you can learn how to stop paranoia and anxiety.

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Tips to Manage Anxiety and Stress

When you’re feeling anxious or stressed, the strategies listed in this resource can help you cope.

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Accordion Panel

When chronic anxiety disrupts your life, you may be willing to try anything. But how can you learn what’s trustworthy and what will work for you?

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Complementary and Alternative Therapies

Complementary and alternative medicine, or CAM, is growing as people search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression, and other mental health disorders.

CAM Resources Mind-Body Practices Mind-Body Podcast

Anxiety & Depression Association of America Resources

Specific Anxiety Disorders and Conditions

Keep Workplace Stress at Bay

An unexpected phone call. A rush deadline. A challenging coworker.You never know when or how anxiety will hit while youre at work. And these feelings can affect anyone, even someone who isnt diagnosed with the condition. So, how do we gain a tighter handle on unexpected stressors?

In a recent blog post, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) shared strategies that people can use to cope with mild anxiety. The following tactics came as the result of a study completed by research teams from La Trobe University and The University of Melbourne in Victoria, Australia. (The following is an excerpt from Practical, Effective Self-Help Strategies for Mild Anxiety by the American Psychiatric Association.)

Cognitive change/Analytic strategies

  • If a worry comes into your head, ask yourself whether it is a problem you can actually solve.
  • When feeling anxious, ask yourself whether your thoughts right now are helping your anxiety or not.
  • Generate some helpful thoughts, and say them to yourself in anxious situations (e.g., other people have managed with my problems, so I can too, Ill never be perfect, just like everyone else, this is difficult, but I got through it before).
  • Identify the specific situations or triggers that are making you stressed or anxious and keep a record of your anxiety levels.
  • Understand the typical ways you react and behave when you become anxious.

Coping techniques/Interpersonal strategies

  • Carry a list of things that may help if you become frightened or anxious (e.g., strategies, alternative thoughts).
  • Seek support from friends and family.
  • Talk about problems and feelings with a trusted person who will listen and understand.

Lifestyle/Reducing tension

  • Spend time in contact with nature/more time outdoors.
  • Have regular leisure time (e.g., pursuing a hobby).
  • Eat regular meals.
  • Relieve times of high anxiety by exercise or physical activity.
  • Use a self-help book based on cognitive behavior therapy principles.

Source:
APA Staff (2016, September 9). Practical, Effective Self-Help Strategies for Mild Anxiety [Blog post]. Retrieved fromhttps://psychiatry.org/news-room/apa-blogs/apa-blog/2016/09/practical-effective-self-help-strategies-for-mild-anxiety

Right Direction is an effort from the Partnership for Workplace Mental Health, a program of the American Psychiatric Association Foundation and Employers Health Coalition, Inc., and is supported by Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc. (TPUSA) and Lundbeck U.S.

Reducing Stress in the Workplace

We all encounter stress in our daily life. Since we spend a good part of every day at work, reducing stress in the workplace is a big step toward overall stress management, not to mention overall mental health.

Some stress is good for us. It keeps us motivated and gives us energy. But chronic stress is unhealthy and counterproductive. When we continually experience high levels of stress, we do not perform well. It can also lead to depression, and other mental illnesses.

You can take steps toward stress reduction. Perhaps the most important step is simply taking care of your body. By getting the proper amount of sleep, eating healthy foods and exercising, you will be better prepared to deal with stressful situations. Some other stress-reduction tips are:

Prioritize and Organize

Having too many tasks to accomplish is stressful. The workload can look mountainous if we dont break down tasks into more manageable chunks. Start by scheduling your day prioritizing what you need to do, what you would like to do and what can wait. Feeling out of control is often what leads to higher stress levels. By planning and scheduling time to accomplish tasks, you exert a level of control over your situation.

Be a Calming Influence

Speaking of control, you cannot control how other people will act. Dont let someone else control your mood or stress levels. You choose how to react to others. If you remain calm, your behavior may affect others and bring the stress levels down for everyone.

Let Go of Perfection

We would like to perform every task perfectly, but that isnt possible. So why hold onto the idea of perfection? Dont let perfectionist tendencies get you down. Do your best, work hard and let it go.

Turn Negatives Into Positives

Negative thinking is another sure-fire stress inducer. For one week, trying looking for the positive in every situation at work. It may be hard at first, and even seem ridiculous. But you can train yourself to think positively. If we make a concerted effort to look at things positively, we wont change the circumstances, but we will change how the circumstances affect our bodies in the form of stress.

Take Time Off

Its true taking vacation days and lunch breaks typically increases productivity. Over the long haul, people who use their vacation time are more satisfied with their jobs and better able to handle work stresses. Even taking a lunch break every day is helpful in reducing stress levels and maintaining productivity.

Connect with Others

Being with other people is a natural stress-reliever. That can mean kicking back with the people who know you best or chatting in an online forum with someone who shares your stresses and concerns. The sense of belonging is a powerful human need, and fulfilling it in positive, constructive ways will make you feel more relaxed.

Ask for Help

Remember that theres no weakness is reaching out for help. Ask family and friends for support. Tell them openly and honestly about the issues troubling you. Also make use of Kaman Work-Life Solutions and mental health services when self-help strategies arent enough.

Learning to manage stress is an important life skill. Apply these techniques, as well as your own stress relievers, to your workday. By taking an active role in combating chronic stress, you will become more productive, happier and ready to take on new challenges.

Source:
APA Staff (2016, September 9). Practical, Effective Self-Help Strategies for Mild Anxiety [Blog post]. Retrieved fromhttps://psychiatry.org/news-room/apa-blogs/apa-blog/2016/09/practical-effective-self-help-strategies-for-mild-anxiety

Right Direction is an effort from the Partnership for Workplace Mental Health, a program of the American Psychiatric Association Foundation and Employers Health Coalition, Inc., and is supported by Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc. (TPUSA) and Lundbeck U.S.

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